Assumptions of mindfulness

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Here are some of the basic assumptions about mindfulness

 We all suffer. The word “suffer” refers to all the negative experiences of our lives; all the way from stark terror to minor disappointment or unhappiness.

 We suffer not because of the EVENTS (including the PEOPLE) in our lives; rather because of the THOUGHTS, and especially the BELIEFS, we hold about these people and events.

 Almost all of the thoughts and beliefs we hold did not originate with us. They were taught to us and learned by us from many sources (parents, teachers, churches, newspapers, books, TV, etc.) and they are being taught to us even today. Many of these people cared for us and taught what they believed to be useful and true; because they learned it from their previous generation.

 We have absorbed this paradigm deeply enough that we no longer question much of it; we assume it. We simply believe it to be the truth.

 For most of us, these teachings have not helped us to have a rich, full, happy, meaningful life. And because we seldom question many of them, we come to believe that what we’ve got is as good as it’s going to be.

 Mindfulness is the process of questioning our assumptions and exploring a path leading to the qualities listed above.

 We sit in meditation to explore the “territory within.” We particularly sit to explore and thus to become familiar with the contents and process of our mind. We do this because it’s our MIND (thought process) which determines our experience. We explore the possibilities that come from literally CHANGING OUR MIND, and thus changing our experience of the events of our lives.

Mindfulness suggests that we CAN have the life we want, but it probably won’t be found by changing the “world out side of ourselves.” It comes from changing the world INSIDE, because we actually LIVE and experience our lives inside of our skin. Mindfulness is one of the paths we use to live the life that we want.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One thought on “ : Assumptions of mindfulness”
  • Robert says:

    Thank you…keep em coming!

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